Giant Grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus

Identity card

Giant Grouper

Scientific name:
Epinephelus lanceolatus
Family:
Serranidae -Epinephelidae
Class:
Actinopterygii
Phylum:
Chordata
Year of description:
Bloch, 1790
IUCN Status:
Data Deficient
Distribution:

Red Sea, Indian Ocean, Western Pacific as far as the Hawaiian Islands and Pitcairn, south of Japan to Australia.

Habitat:

It is found in the open sea around artificial reefs. This species is mostly sedentary and stays close to the coral reefs

Size:

It can measure up to 2.70 metres and weigh 300 kg.

Diet:

The giant grouper feeds on fish, sometimes even small sharks, crustaceans such as lobsters or even young sea turtles.

Giant Grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus
 

Before coming to NAUSICAA, our groupers were raised in other European partner aquariums.

The giant grouper feeds on fish, sometimes even small sharks, crustaceans such as lobsters or even young sea turtles.

Did you know?

Where is the animal to be found?

This species is mostly sedentary and stays close to coral reefs: they are often the first animals to colonise these areas. It is found in the open sea around artificial reefs and also near lagoons, holes and caves, wrecks and deep estuaries down to a depth of 200 metres, but on average to a depth of 50 metres. Juveniles are sometimes found in brackish water.

How can it be recognised?

It is the only grouper with spines that gradually increase in size towards the tail. Juveniles have black and yellow spots and become mottled brown as they mature.

It can measure up to 2.70 metres and weigh 300 kg.

What is distinctive about it?

The giant grouper is hermaphrodite. It can change gender in response to the need for breeding stock. This flexibility means that the population size can be kept in balance with the environment

Threat and protective measure

Species turnover can be lengthy and haphazard.

Where can I find it at Nausicaá?

JOURNEY ON THE HIGH SEAS

Giant Grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus

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