Brick Soldierfish

Brick Soldierfish

  Tropical reef fish

Brick Soldierfish

Identity card

Brick Soldierfish

Scientific name:
Myripristis amaena
Family:
Holocentridae
Class:
Actinopterygii
Phylum:
Chordata
Year of description:
Castelnau, 1873
IUCN Status:
Least Concern
Distribution:

Pacific Ocean: Indonesia and the Philippines to the Hawaiian Islands and Ducie; north of the Ryukyu Islands

Habitat:

Tropical marine reefs, at depths of 25 to over 150 metres.

Size:

Maximum length 26.5 cm.

Diet:

Zooplankton, primarily crustacean larvae.

Longevity:

This species lives up to at least 14 years and is late maturing and slow growing

Where can I find it at Nausicaá?

JOURNEY ON THE HIGH SEAS

Diving in High Seas

Brick Soldierfish

Did you know?

In Hawaii and Johnston Atoll, sexually mature fish measure between 14.5 and 16 cm and are about 6 years old.

Peak egg laying occurs from early April to early May, with a secondary peak in September. It is carnivorous: it eats zooplankton, primarily crustacean larvae. 

Brick Soldierfish
 

This species lives up to at least 14 years and is late maturing and slow growing

Where is the animal to be found?

The Brick soldierfish lives close to the seabed in tropical marine reefs, at depths ranging from 25 to over 150 metres

How can it be recognised? 

The brick soldierfish has very large eyes. It can grow to a maximum length of 26.5 cm.

What is distinctive about it?

It is a nocturnal species. During the day, they gather in large numbers in caves where they are protected from the light.

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