Common Green Iguana Iguana iguana

Common Green Iguana

  Reptiles and amphibians

Common Green Iguana Iguana iguana

Identity card

Common Green Iguana

Scientific name:
Iguana iguana
Family:
Iguanidae
Class:
Reptilia
Phylum:
Chordata
Year of description:
Linnaeus, 1758
IUCN Status:
Least Concern
CITES-status:

appendix II

Distribution:

It is native to subtropical America.

Habitat:

It is found in a humid equatorial climate, with a low temperature range and an annual average of 25°.

Size:

In the wild, they can grow up to 2.5 metres long, including the tail.

Diet:

Its diet is essentially vegetarian. It feeds on leaves from rain forest plants and also eats fruits and flowers.

Common Green Iguana Iguana iguana
 

NAUSICAA has already taken in some "domestic" iguanas that were bought as pets.

It was introduced by humans to the Lesser Antilles and the Greater Antilles and threatens the endemic species of these islands, especially the Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima) which is facing critical extinction.

did you know?

The ancestor of this saurian already lived in the Carboniferous period (more than 300 million years ago), although it was not until the Jurassic period (180 million years ago) that it took on the appearance of a lizard.

Where is the animal to be found?

It is native to subtropical America. It lives in southern Mexico, Central America, the northern part of South America (as far as Peru, Brazil and Paraguay); and in the Lesser Antilles where it was introduced by man, as well as in Florida and the Hawaiian Islands.

It is found in a humid equatorial climate, with a low thermal amplitude and an annual average of 25°. It is arboreal and usually lives in forests near rivers, freshwater ponds, and mangroves.

How can it be recognised?

In the wild, they can grow up to 2.5 metres long, including the tail. In captivity, they hardly grow any longer than 1.5 metres.

The iguana's tail accounts for 60% of its body length.

Females reach sexual maturity at 3 years old. They lay between 10 and 80 eggs that hatch after 90 days of incubation.

What is distinctive about it?

Iguanas need sunlight to keep warm and to absorb calcium. To find the best climatic conditions, they use their UV-sensitive eyes and a third heat-sensitive eye located on their skull

Threat and protective measure

It benefits from protection and control measures with regard to its trade.

Iguana strolling

Where can I find it at Nausicaá?

Mankind and shores

iguane vert iguana iguana

Reptiles and amphibians

The Ocean Mag

Browse through our Ocean Mag

A la une

A treaty on biodiversity in the high seas

More than 80 states gathered at the United Nations in New York have already signed the international treaty on the protection of the high seas.

banc de mérous ile de malpelo

Article

LINEUP OCEAN in Nausicaá’s big tank

A dive into the big tank for LINEUP OCEAN, a startup incubated at Nausicaá’s Blue Living Lab!

Article

Grey seal or common seal: how to recognise the seals on the Opal Coast

To observe the seals on the Opal Coast, it’s better if you know how to make the distinction between grey seals and common seals!